Pie for Breakfast & Christmas Cactus


I officially start my Christmas season with pumpkin pie for breakfast. Thanksgiving was wonderful, all 3 of my girls were here. We had a great day, lots of good food, games, memories and so much to be thankful for! Yorkshire pudding was on the menu, as it has been for generations in my family. This year it raised up nice and puffy….made up for the gravy which was a little on the thin side, lol.
I saved some of the seeds from the spaghetti squash. Hopefully I can get these to grow in the spring and if I manage to confound the dreaded squash borer this year, I love the idea of having squash in the summer from the one we had at Thanksgiving.
The market had these pretty Christmas cactuses for $5.00. I couldn’t resist. They are easy house plants and live for generations. Once this little cactus settles down and gets used to its new home, I’ll transplant it and with permanent marker write the date and my name on the new pot. I’ll paint a rock with the same information and a little picture of a bee. If I use acrylic paint and varnish it, set it on top of the soil with the plant, that will last for years too. Maybe some day a grandchild who loves plants like I do will have this plant! My blogger friend Ginene, from Fox and Finch Antiques had violet plants that were her great Aunt’s from 1955! Thanks for the inspiration, Ginene, and have a wonderful day everyone!!

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38 thoughts on “Pie for Breakfast & Christmas Cactus

  1. What a great idea for the Christmas cactus. I have one that survived for a few years, and then it started to break apart. I saved a couple of pieces and replanted them in small containers. I need to plant them in new pots. I want to do what you did with the name and date.

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      • It occurred to me this morning that you may be able to answer my question. I noticed your cactus came in a medium size pot. My original came in a small pot. Do they grow only so big (medium pot size)? Or do they need to be transplanted from time to time? I’m going to attempt searching on the internet, but this is one area where I’m such a complete beginner even the easy instructions make no sense to me. πŸ™„

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  2. Hi Cynthia, I believe that your “Christmas” cactus may actually be a “Thanksgiving” cactus. I notice that the outer edges on the leaves of your plant have little points on them which is indicative of the leaves of the Thanksgiving cactus. The leaves of the Christmas cactus are perfectly smooth on the outside edges.
    This year my lovely pink Thanksgiving cactus gave me it’s first bloom the day before Thanksgiving. And it never ceases to amaze me that although Thanksgiving falls on a different date each year, this plant has been in bloom in time for Thanksgiving every year without fail – another precious wonder within the realm of Mother Nature………….

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    • Hi Gloria! the edges do have little points. I never heard of a Thanksgiving cactus! The tag said zygot cactus. Thanks! I like this idea, it will remind me of this Thanksgiving for years to come…..a great one to remember:}

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  3. Cynthia! Thank you for the shout out and I have to tell you what I had for breakfast which was many hours ago…like 12 hours ago. I had rhubarb/pineapple pie!
    That is a beautiful Thanksgiving Cactus with that faint pink tinge. My mother was really good at growing those and she had the same kind of windows you have your plant in.
    Now, I did not know there was a Thanksgiving and a Christmas Cactus.
    Ginene

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    • Rhubarb/pinapple, that is something new to me. It sounds really good! I didn’t know there was such a thing as a Thanksgiving cactus either. Gloria is really knowledgeable about plants and an avid researcher. I’m always learning things from her!

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      • So happy to hear that you had a memorable Thanksgiving, Cindy – but then again, how could you not with all your girls at home with you πŸ˜‰
        Every now and then my birthday falls on Thanksgiving and several years ago, a few days before the holiday, I was in a quaint little gift shop with an attached green house. As I entered the green house, I was overwhelmed by all the cactus in bloom. I asked the attendant why all the “Christmas cactus” were already in bloom a month early. She then explained to me that they were actually Thanksgiving cactus and noted all the little points on the leaves. That year I bought myself a birthday present of a Thanksgiving cactus so that every single day (even when I’m in a bad mood;) I would be reminded to give thanks for all the goodness in my life. And now Cindy, I’m thrilled to know that your lovely blush THANKSGIVING CACTUS will always remind you of a very special day in your life also ……

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      • So funny Cindy – I actually left my post below under your previous post about the Thanksgiving cactus – guess I’m not too savy on this site;(
        But anyway, I guess we both have a love of sharing because my feelings are that I am always overwhelmed with your vast knowledge on so many exciting subjects. And I always come away from a conversation with you so thrilled with all the interesting and useful info that you are always so willing to share – thanks for being you!

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  4. Love Christmas cactus! My parents one that according to family story came West on the wagon train in the 1800’s. The stems were very woody. I hoped to one day inherit it, but it died. I tried to start several cuttings from theirs, but never had any luck getting them firmly rooted.

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  5. Lovely! We have a Christmas Cactus, inherited from my great aunt, that is at least 50 years old. I’m in the process of propagating some babies from it to share with my brothers. πŸ˜‰ Cheers, Ben

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  6. Yorkshire pudding- I thought it was one of those Dutch baby pancakes at first when I saw the picture. What’s in it? Lovely blog, I’m feeling some crafty/DIY winter inspiration from your posts!

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    • Thanks!! I am crazy about your blog! I wish I could bring home 13 baby pigs. Yorkshire pudding is a big popover..just milk, eggs and flour. It puffs up and gets crusty on the outside and it’s served hot, with gravy.

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