No Water

This morning there was no running water. Luckily, a nice man came right away to assess the problem. It turned out to be a pretty big one, as far as these things go. The well pump was broken. Finding the pump was the first issue. For a while he thought it may have been under the patio or even worse, under the driveway pavement.  Good thing it wasn’t. He said the problem with old farmhouses is that there’s a lot of buried metal and his pump locater gets thrown off.   Once he had a good idea where the pump might be, he started digging  with a shovel but things got complicated and the man had to get a backhoe. He ran over an electricity line but it only went to the garage and nobody got hurt. Codes have changed since the pump was last replaced in 1979. Things will have to be set up differently. If all goes well, I should have water next week some time. Now, it’s late in the day and the nice man is still out there digging with the backhoe. This pump is down deep, I guess. It could have been worse. I’m glad it didn’t break a couple months ago when the snow was 3 feet high. We would have had to wait til the frost table went down and that would have caused a cascade of home owner disasters.. frozen pipes, heating and plumbing problems… Best to count blessings at this point.

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22 thoughts on “No Water

    • Thanks, Judy. I think I got really lucky with the company we called. Its a small , local business. He was here all day and coming back tomorrow–a Sunday! I feel relieved to have someone here that i have confidence in and feel comfortable with.

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  1. Sorry to hear; hope you have an alternative source of water. We used to have water restrictions when I was growing up in Hong Kong. Water supply was reduced to once every four days, but the squatters in the slums had to share one tap and line up for water that they could carry.

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    • it’s amazing all the things that are so taken for granted. There’s a river across the street from me that I can fill jugs up with for flushing the toilet and water my seeds with. I’ll just fill big jars from my friend’s house and stick them in the fridge for drinking and cooking and washing. Thanks, Mary! Glad to get the Hong Kong perspective too! this is nothing, really:)

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  2. Whoa. Sorry to hear about that, but really cool to hear about the old farmhouse and metal and all of that! Around here, no one can dig unless the electric people come & mark all electrical lines. Glad to hear no one was hurt. I suppose you’ll just make an adventure out of it all 🙂

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      • I’d like to see what you found, too. I always save everything I find and keep it as a memory of that house. I once found a “spooner” under the front porch of my farmhouse in Wisconsin. How did that get there? Yes, the Hong Kong story helps one keep their perspective, and what you said about taking things for granted, still, it isn’t fun!
        The money bit is a stone, cold drag.

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  3. Wow! That’s a doozy of a surprise. You sound like you are handling it beautifully. That is a big part of what allows for living a beautiful life. Kudos to you. Good luck with everything. Let’s hear it for local small businesses and the exemplary service they are able and willing to provide!

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    • Thanks, John! I was really anxious when the water dribbled away to nothing. Inconvenience I can deal with and money is an issue that always seems to work out, pretty used to that, lol. I appreciate this business and the way that this man has handled everything very much. Perfectly said..”lets hear it for local small businesses and the exemplary service they are able and willing to provide!” so admirable, very heartening.

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  4. I feel your pain. The pipes to our old farm house pipes froze for nearly two months this winter. Luckily we had a frost free spigot at the pump house so we could haul water. Good luck!

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  5. Thanks, Dan! Geez, hauling water for 2 months through this freezing, snowy winter sounds horrible. Pretty sure I would not have been a good sport for very long if I had to do that.

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  6. So glad the pump didn’t go in the winter. Oh, my word! Our pump is down cellar, so when it goes, replacing it will not be that difficult. However, I know that not all wells can handle such a pump. Anyway, may the pump repair go quickly and well!

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    • Yes – our well pump is in the cellar as well – good thing, too. I has broken 2 or 3 times in the 20 years we have lived here. We have so much iron in the water that it goops things up. Glad we don’t have to go digging every time.

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